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Hospice Voices

Anna's story

“Everything changed for me when the Hospice stepped in and gave me support”

We’ve been helping to support Anna with her terminal illness for over a year now, by offering various services that can help make adjustments to life a little easier. When she was diagnosed, Anna didn’t think about asking for help from a Hospice, it was someone suggesting she get in touch that helped her access the support she didn’t know she needed.

“I don’t think I’d be here, honestly don’t, I was in such a low place. It was before all my treatment started working and it was all a huge risk that I’d taken with my treatment. Because we didn’t know whether it would work or not.

I feel like the Hospice saved my life. They gave me the hope and support that I needed.”

Anna is the face of our first ever virtual event, hoping to raise £40,000 to support more patients like Anna and those important to them. The virtual Hospice Run is something everyone can get involved in and we can all pull together to make a difference.

“I’ve never been a huge fan of exercise. But, I come every week to my physio sessions or attend online. Sometimes I feel like I have no energy, but I bring myself in every time. Because, I know that when I leave I have the energy.

Our bodies are like a car battery. When a car battery gets low you charge it up by driving it. So, when our bodies are feeling flat and run down we do exercise and physio to help pick ourselves up.”

 

 

By accessing the services at Hospice in the Weald, Anna has not only been able to come to terms with her illness and learn how to adjust her life. But, she has also developed her confidence and mindset to make the most of life and do what is best for her.

“You can continue with some part of your life and know that its not all been taken away from you. You can live part of the life you used to, you just have to live it in a slightly different way. I would much rather do that, than die.

One of the scariest things for me is dying. It’s not something that we generally talk about. It’s a shock to people when they see someone my age or younger with a terminal illness.”